Acclimating Your Cat

In most cases, we’ve heard very positive feedback about cats adapting very quickly to using the furniture. But there are those that are a bit more cautious. If your cat falls into this category, you may want to ease them onto the cat furniture using these tips.

Proper Spacing

First and foremost, you’ll want to be sure that the shelf is installed in a place with easy access points. We suggest the vertical spacing between shelves to be about 12-18” and the horizontal spacing to be about 12-16”. This should be an easy jump for most cats, though you will want to keep your cat’s abilities in mind as you decide the proper height.

Incentives and Rewards

This is really the first thing we do when we mount a new piece on the wall. You want to give your cat positive reinforcements, so they will relate the area to good things. Any time we get treats out our cat Heisenberg jumps on a complex, because that’s where we always feed him treats.

Location

We’ve found that in most cases cats want to be social and around you. If you have the furniture in a room you never hang out in, that may have something to do with it, and you might want to consider moving the furniture to another room.

Stability

Stability is something we keep in mind with everything we make. If it doesn’t feel stable, cats typically don’t want to be on it. This is something to keep in mind mostly for our fabric complexes. We mount these with the fabric pulled tight, or else our cats act like it’s hot lava and won’t walk on it.

If you notice that there is some bounce to the shelf, you’ll want to double check the hardware. Our furniture is designed to have the brackets mounted on top of the planks, so the shelf presses against the wall when weight is introduced to it. Mounting the shelves with the brackets downward can create a “diving board” effect, which may cause your cat to shy away from using it. Another important factor is making sure the cat furniture is installed securely into a stud.